The parallel export ban is to protect stock for private patients and those who are not eligible for the vaccine under the national immunisation programme. Photo: iStock

The measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccines have been added to the list of medicines carrying a parallel export ban.

The latest move aims to protect stock for private patients and those who are not eligible for the vaccine under the national immunisation programme.

The Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) say they are working closely with the wider industry and Public Health England to manage the issue in order to ensure vaccines meant for UK patients remain in the country.

It said there was no supply issue affecting the national immunisation programme, which saw more than 90 per cent of children receive a free jab by the time they were five in 2018 to 2019. All children and adults in the UK are eligible for the vaccine through the NHS.

However, the vaccine is also available outside the national immunisation programme, purchased at a local level through wholesalers by private pharmacies and others. Doses of locally procured MMR vaccines are at risk of being parallel exported.

The government hopes the current restrictions will stop this from happening and safeguard MMR supplies to the private market and for those who are not eligible for jabs under the national programme.

The government first announced ban on parallel exporting 23 types medication earlier in October and later added four more to the list.

The list includes Adrenaline auto-injectors, Estradiol, Hepatitis B(rDNA) suspension injection and Ranitidine.

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