A scheme between Boots and the Department of Health in which patients were asked to sign a pre-commitment containing a warning about the consequences of non-adherence increased the likelihood of them sticking to their course of medicine._x000D_
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A study of 16,191 patients in 254 Boots pharmacies across London produced compelling evidence that adherence increases when patients sign a pre-commitment sticker which is stuck on their medication packaging when ready for collection from the pharmacy._x000D_
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“Those patients who signed their name to a message warning them of the adverse health consequences of non-adherence were significantly more likely to adhere to their medication than a control group,” Boots said._x000D_
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Marc Donovan, chief pharmacist at Boots UK, said: “With over half of patients in the UK not taking their medicines as prescribed, this important research supports improved medicines adherence, and is a brilliant example of a simple yet robust academic trial that has been achieved through collaboration between pharmacies, academics and the government._x000D_
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“Through partnership working more trials of this kind could continue and even more patients start to feel empowered and confident to be in control of taking their medicines.”

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