Researchers from University of Birmingham found significant reductions in the medical risk factors of heart-related diseases through pharmacist-led interventions

Pharmacists working in GP surgeries can play an integral role in cardiovascular disease prevention, according to a recent research.

The study findings, published recently in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, support pharmacists’ involvement as healthcare providers in managing patients with hypertension, diabetes and high cholesterol.

Researchers from the University of Birmingham’s School of Pharmacy and Institute of Applied Health Research identified 21 trials involving 8,933 patients, which assessed the effectiveness of pharmacist-led interventions delivered in general practice.

Their analysis found significant reductions in the medical risk factors of heart-related diseases through pharmacist-led interventions such as medication review and counselling, medication management, patient education, physical assessment, assessing adherence and lifestyle modification.

“The significant reductions in blood pressure, blood glucose, and blood cholesterol reported in this meta-analysis, if sustained in clinical practice, could have significant implications for managing hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidaemia that could prevent cardiovascular morbidity and mortality,” said Abdullah Alshehri, of the University of Birmingham.

Alshehri noted that the findings support greater involvement of pharmacists in general practice and provide an important message to health systems as well as policymakers regarding the effectiveness of GP-based pharmacists’ interventions.

“This will benefit health organisations by providing cost-effective care associated with greater control of patients’ conditions and their medications,” he added.

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